Illinois Burglary and Forgery Charges Levied Against Man in McLean County

Local authorities in McLean County charged a man with burglary and forgery after allegedly tendering a fraudulent check, according to an article by The Pantagraph.

Charging documents indicated that this man attempted to use a fraudulent check at a Commerce Bank branch in Normal, Illinois. The fraudulent check in question was in the amount of $2,300.

At this point, the man in question secured his release from police custody with a $25,000 personal recognizance bond. While this man awaits an arraignment scheduled for October 8, it seems like a proper moment to review the Illinois statutes that govern burglary and forgery offenses. 

Burglary

The Illinois laws against burglary appear at 720 ILCS 5/19-1. Under this section, a person commits burglary if they knowingly and without authority:

    Enter or remain within an aircraft, building, motor vehicle, railroad car, trailer, or watercraft; and Demonstrate an intent to commit theft or
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Illinois Man Charged with Criminal Trespass to Stolen Vehicle

A man from Bloomington, Illinois faces charges for criminal trespass to and possession of a stolen vehicle, according to an article by The Pantagraph.

According to reports, this 19-year-old man allegedly stole a passenger vehicle from its owner. After law enforcement arrested this man, the authorities charged him with criminal trespass to vehicles and possession of a stolen vehicle. 

The Illinois man secured his release from police custody with a $3,000 personal recognizance bond in advance of a September 24 arraignment. While this legal case continues to develop, it seems like a proper instance to review several applicable laws and penalties under the Illinois Criminal Code. 

Criminal Trespass to Vehicles

720 ILCS 5/21-2 explains the Illinois laws against criminal trespass to vehicles. Under this section, it is unlawful to knowingly and without authorization:

    Enter any part of any vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, or snowmobile; or Operate any vehicle, aircraft, watercraft,
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What is the Difference Between Burglary and Robbery in Illinois?

The Illinois Criminal Code prohibits any person from committing various theft crimes, including burglary and robbery. These two offenses go beyond the baseline requirements for standard crimes, applying conditions such as breaking and entering or the use of force. Though there are distinct differences between burglary and robbery in Illinois. 

What is the Illinois Definition of Burglary?

The Illinois definition of burglary appears at 720 ILCS 5/19-1. Under this section, it is unlawful for any person to knowingly and without legal authority:

    Enters a building, house-trailer, watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, railroad car with intent to commit theft or a felony crime; or Remains within a building, house-trailer, watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, railroad car with intent to commit theft or a felony crime. 

How Does Illinois Punish Burglary?

Section 19-1 also furnishes the Illinois punishment for burglary. But this punishment can change based on various factors, including the presence [...]

How is a Fake ID Different From Obstructing Identification in Illinois?

Across the State of Illinois, it is often a crime to possess or use a fraudulent ID card, which is also referred to as a “fake ID.” In more recent times, the General Assembly created a new law that prohibits any person from obstructing identification. Although these offenses might seem similar, they are actually completely separate crimes.  

How Does Illinois Define and Punish Obstructing Identification?

The Illinois laws against obstructing identification appear at 720 ILCS 5/31-4.5. Under this section, it is unlawful to intentionally or knowingly supply a false or fictitious name, address, or birthdate to a police officer who has:

    Arrested the person in question lawfully; Detained the person in question lawfully; or Requested information from a person, when there is good cause to believe that the person witnessed a crime.

A violation of Section 31-4.5 is normally charged as a Class A misdemeanor. If [...]