Oct 29

Local authorities charged a man from Bloomington, Illinois with burglary, according to an article by The Pantagraph

Court documents indicated that the Illinois man in question entered another person’s garage without legal authority or justification. In addition, the Illinois man demonstrated an intent to commit theft, which can be an element of burglary offenses under state law. 

As a result of this incident, local authorities arrested the Illinois man and filed burglary charges. At this point, the Illinois man remains in police custody after declining to post $1,535 in bail. 

While this Illinois man awaits an arraignment scheduled for November 19, it seems like an appropriate opportunity to review the Illinois laws against and punishment for burglary offenses. 

Illinois Laws Against Burglary

720 ILCS 5/19-1 supplies the Illinois laws against burglary. There are two elements to the offense of burglary under Illinois law. The first element of this offense requires the offender to knowingly and without authority:

  • Enter any building, house-trailer, watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, or railroad car; or
  • Remain within any building, house-trailer, watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, or railroad car.

The second element of this offense requires the offender to demonstrate an intent to commit theft or any other felony crime.

Illinois Punishment for Burglary

Section 19-1 also furnishes the Illinois punishment for burglary. Even though burglary is always classified as a felony crime in Illinois, the precise charge does fluctuate based on the circumstances of the offense. 

It is a Class 3 felony to commit burglary in, and without causing damage to, any watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, or railroad car. If convicted of this felony, the Illinois punishment can include imprisonment for two to five years and criminal fines up to $25,000. 

It is a Class 2 felony to commit burglary in any building or house-trailer. It is also a Class 2 felony to commit burglary and cause damage to any watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, or railroad car. If convicted of this felony, the Illinois punishment can include imprisonment for three to seven years and criminal fines up to $25,000. 

It is a Class 2 felony to commit burglary in any school, day care center or home, child care facility, or place of worship. If convicted of this felony, the Illinois punishment can include imprisonment for four to 15 years and criminal fines up to $25,000.

Do You Need Legal Help?

No matter what the criminal offense, all charges are serious. A sound strategy and an aggressive defense are essential for a positive outcome. To protect your rights in such situations, it is highly advisable to retain legal counsel from an experienced criminal defense attorney.

The Prior Law Firm in Bloomington, Illinois, has proven experience in matters of criminal defense. If you need legal help with criminal defense, contact us today for a free consultation. You can reach The Prior Law Firm by phone at (309) 827-4300, email at johnprior@thepriorlawfirm.com or by completing an online form.